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Málaga An Art Laden Holy Week Break

Málaga’s Holy Week is among the most popular in Spain. Each year it draws some five million tourists eager to succumb both to the city’s charms and the magical extravaganza of this festivity, a blend of the religious, traditional and cultural. Designated a Tourist Interest Site on 16 February 1980 and dating back to the time of the Catholic Kings, Holy Week in Málaga is an obligatory event for anyone wishing to experience first-hand a unique spectacle, guaranteed to move even the die-hards.

Apart from the traditional features of Holy Week, anyone coming to Málaga at this time of year can take the opportunity to visit some of the numerous museums and art centres here, some of them recently inaugurated, to delight in the plethora of art on display. Following is our selection of the most prominent exhibitions open to the public during the festive week in Málaga.

Picasso Museum of Málaga

The city of Málaga is inextricably linked to the figure of Picasso as it was here that he was born. Part of the art genius’ legacy is preserved here – specifically, the Picasso Museum of Málaga houses 285 of his works, spanning 80 years of his career, from 1892 to 1972. Imperative, therefore, to visit the Buenavista Palace, home to the collection on public display. Those of you who can afford to visit Málaga later on in the year, take note that from 26 April to 17 September you can also see the exhibition, Bacon, Freud and the School of London, a joint endeavour with the Tate Britain.

Carmen Thyssen Museum

Another must-visit collection in Málaga is housed in the Carmen Thyssen Museum. Located in the Villalón Palace, it is essentially a review of the various genres in 19th-century Spanish painting. In addition to the permanent exhibition, during Holy Week you can also see La apariencia de lo real. Cincuenta años de arte realista en España (1960-2010), an exhibition which features a converging perspective between contemporary Spanish realism and the tradition of Baroque naturalism. Another option to consider is the exhibition Japan. Prints and Art Objects, which runs until 23 April and showcases a selection of exhibits from traditional Japanese art, most of them on loan from the Bilbao Fine Arts Museum.

Centre Pompidou, Málaga

Another of the city’s major attractions is the Centre Pompidou, Málaga. Opened in March 2015, its collection provides an interesting journey through 20th- and 21st-century art. Additionally, from 23 March to 23 April, the Centre will be hosting the second edition of Hors Pistes. Entitled Travesías marítimas, this exhibition explores shipping routes and the impact they have had in the field of art and motion images.

Russian Museum Collection

The building which once housed the Real Fábrica de Tabacos de Málaga (tobacco factory) is the site of this magnificent temporary exhibition, on loan from the State Russian Museum of Saint Petersburg. Apart from the annual temporary exhibition devoted to The Romanov Dynasty, until 16 July you can also see the exhibition Kandinsky and Russia, which delves into the Russian period of this forerunner of abstract painting and iconic figure of 20th-century art.

Málaga Museum

One of the more recent additions to a city which is seeing a boom in its cultural offerings is the Málaga Museum, housed in the Neoclassical Palace of La Aduana. Inaugurated on 12 December 2016 after a remodelling project that took 10 years to complete, the Museum has on display 2,200 exhibits of a total of 17,500 making up its two collections. This comprises 2,000 exhibits from the overall 15,000 listed in the Provincial Archeological Museum, and a further 200 out of a total of 2,000 from the Provincial Fine Arts Museum. This is a first for a city which you should make a point of visiting!

Book your Vueling to Málaga and indulge in what promises to be an unforgettable Holy Week, thanks to its emotionally charged processions and the magnificent offerings of its art museums.

Text by Los Viajes de ISABELYLUIS

Images by Epizentrum